What percent of 752 is 25?

2 Answers
Jul 22, 2016

Answer:

#3 61/188%#

In Decimal it is approximately, #3.3245%#

Explanation:

Suppose that #25# is #p%# of #752#.

Then, this means that, #752*p/100=25#

#:.p=25*100/752=25*25/188=625/188=3 61/188#

In decimal, #p~=3.3245#

Jul 22, 2016

Answer:

About 3.3%

Explanation:

When solving problems such as these, I will always remember a simple equation my Algebra teacher taught me:

  • part = percent #*# whole
    (part equals percent times whole)

The 'hardest' part about it is you'd have to find out which is which (which is the percent, which is the part, and which is the whole), and I have to say, it's actually not hard at all once you get the hang of it!

In your case, you're trying to find the percent . How do I know? It is asking you "what percent", which should immediately let you know that the percent is the variable, or the value you are solving the equation for. Now, for the sake of convenience, let's turn the word "percent" into a variable. What about #x#?

  • part = #x *# whole

The question then states "OF 752", which is another hint. What percent OF 752. The percent should be of 752, which indicates that the 752 is the whole. Great! We have now found the whole. Now let's plug that into our equation:

  • part = #x * 752#

Where does that leave us? With the 25, of course, which leaves us with no choice other than to place it in the "part" side of the equation:

  • #25# = #x * 752#

Now, let's mash that #x# and that #752# together and flip the equation around just to make things easier:

  • #752x# = #25#

Now we're at the fun part. Divide both sides by #752# to separate it from the #x#. Remember, whatever you do on one side of an equation you must do to the other:

  • #752/752x# = #25/752#

And that leaves us with:

  • #x# = #25/752#

And to convert this fraction into a percent, you must divide the numerator by the denominator, and in your case you must divide #25# by #752#:

  • #0.332#

Multiply that decimal by #100#:

  • #3.32#

And there goes your answer! I hope I helped.

Note: There's an easier way you can go about solving these types of equations. You can always use this:

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