Why is Sulfur Oxide (SO) a covalent bond?

1 Answer
Jun 15, 2018

Answer:

Because they're both nonmetals...

Explanation:

Covalent bonds form mainly between two or more nonmetals. This happens through the sharing of electrons. Any gas molecule made with entirely nonmetals, such as #CO_2#, #CH_4#, #SO_2#, #NO_2#,... are all held together by covalent bonds.

Sulfur and oxygen are both nonmetals due to their position on the periodic table, and so sulfur monoxide or #SO# would just be held by covalent bonding.