Question #784d6

1 Answer
Oct 15, 2016

Answer:

All of the above.

Explanation:

All you really have to do here is be familiar with the solubility rules for ionic compounds.

http://highered.mheducation.com/olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::::/sites/dl/free/0023654666/650262/Solubility_Rules_4_02.jpg::Solubility%20rules

Lead(II) sulfate, #"PbSO"_4# is insoluble in aqueous solution because the sulfate anions, #"SO"_4^(2-)#, form an insoluble compound when paired with the lead(II) cations, #"Pb"^(2+)#.

The same can be said of silver chloride, #"AgCl"#, and calcium carbonate, #"CaCO"_3#.

The silver cations, #"Ag"^(+)#, and the chloride anions, #"Cl"^(-)#, form an insoluble compound when paired with each other. Likewise, the calcium cations, #"Ca"^(2+)#, and the carbonate anions, #"CO"_3^(2-)#, precipitate as calcium carbonate when paired with each other.

There's really no workaround knowing the solubility rules, so make sure that you're at least familiar with some of the more important soluble and insoluble ionic compounds.