Will sodium fluoride and calcium nitrate react to produce a precipitate?

1 Answer
Apr 25, 2017

Answer:

There is a precipitate, which is calcium fluoride, #("CaF"_2")#.

Explanation:

Balanced Equation

#"2NaF(aq) + Ca(NO"_3)_2("aq")##rarr##"CaF"_2("s") + "2NaNO"_3("aq")"#

As you can see, a precipitate (solid) does form, and it is calcium fluoride #("CaF"_2")#.

This is an example of of a double replacement (double displacement or metathesis) reaction. Evidence of a double replacement reaction include a precipitate, or an insoluble gas must bubble out of solution, or water must be a product (neutralization reaction). The generic equation that represents a double replacement reaction is:

#"AX + BY"##rarr##"AY + BX"#

where #"A and B"# are cations, and #"X and Y"# are anions.

There are solubility rules that can help you determine whether a precipitate will form, and what it is. As you can see, fluoride and calcium ions form a solid, as designated by an "s".

http://pmstechnoreview.weebly.com/precipitate-reactions.html