According to Bohr’s model of the atom, in which orbitals do electrons have the least energy?

2 Answers
Nov 9, 2015

Answer:

The innermost orbital

Explanation:

In the Bohr model, the most stable, lowest energy level is found in the innermost orbit. This first orbital forms a shell around the nucleus and is assigned a principal quantum number (n) of n=1.. Additional orbital shells are assigned values n=2, n=3, n=4, etc.

As electrons move farther away from the nucleus, they gain potential energy and become less stable. Atoms with electrons in their lowest energy orbits are in a "ground" state, and those with electrons jumped to higher energy orbits are in an exicted state

Read more: Bohr Model - Energy, Electrons, Quantum, and Electron - JRank Articles http://science.jrank.org/pages/982/Bohr-Model.html#ixzz3r2UWP34r"excited" state.

Nov 9, 2015

Answer:

The base orbital i.e. the one that is smallest and closest to the nucleus.

Explanation:

According to Bohr's model, as en electron moves from a higher orbital to a lower orbital, and eventually reaches a state where no more energy is released i.e. the electron is in the lowest energy or base orbital, which is the one closest to the nucleus.

EDIT: This answer is very similar to Ghadeer A's answer which must have been posted while I was writing this one. I wil leave this answer up though because the slightly different wording may help someone understand Ghadeer's answer a bit better.