How do you do titration problems to find molarity?

1 Answer
Aug 7, 2016

Answer:

See below.

Explanation:

Titration is used to determine the unknown molarity (#M#) of a solution (called analyte) using a titrant, which is a solution of known concentration.

Considering the analyte is an acidic solution (unknown molarity) and that it will be titrated using a basic solution with a known molarity (assuming monoprotic acid and base).

At the equivalence point, the number of mole of #H^+# ions will be equal to the number of mole of #OH^-# ions:

#n_(H^+)=n_(OH^-)#

Note that the relationship between molarity and number of mole is:

#M=n/V# where #V# is the volume of the solution.

Thus, #n=MxxV#.

Therefore, #M_(a)xxV_(a)=M_(b)xxV_(b)#

#=>M_(a)=(M_(b)xxV_(b))/(V_(a))#

Here is a video that fully explains this topic:
Lab Demonstration | Acid - Base Titration.