How do you graph using the intercepts for #2x+6y=0#?

1 Answer
May 29, 2018

Answer:

Refer to explanation below.

Explanation:

#2x + 6y = 0#

First rearrange the equation.
#2x + 6y = 0#
# 6y = 0 - 2x#
#y =# #(-2x)/6#

Now, substitute x = 0 into the equation to find the intersection with the y-axis.
#y=(-(2*0))/6#
#y=0/6#
#y=0#
Therefore the graph intersects the y-axis at (0, 0)

Now, substitute y = 0 into the equation to find the intersection with the x-axis.
#0=(-(2x))/6#
#6*0=-2x#
#0/-2=x#
Therefore the graph intersects the x-axis at (0, 0)

The gradient of the graph is found by looking at the coefficient of x.
#y=(-(2x))/6#
#y=(-(1x))/3#
#y=(-1/3)x#
Therefore the graph is observed to have a negative gradient with the value of #1/3#

graph{2x + 6y = 0 [-10, 10, -5, 5]}