How do you graph using the intercepts for #x+2y=5#?

2 Answers
May 30, 2018

Answer:

See below

Explanation:

To find the intercepts, substitute in #x=0# to find the y-intercept and #y=0# to find the x-intercept, so:

Substitute #x=0# into #x+2y=5#
#0+2y=5#
#2y=5#
#y=5/2#
Therefore, the y-intercept is #y=5/2#, also written as #y=2.5#

Substitute #y=0# into #x+2y=5#
#x+2(0)=5#
#x=5#
Therefore, the x-intercept is #x=5#

If you do not already know so, the x-intercept is where the line touches or crosses through the x-axis and the y-intercept is where the line touches or crosses through the y-axis.

Now that you know the intercepts, simply indicate on the graph the points #(5, 0)#(the x-intercept) and #(0, 2.5)# (the y-intercept) and draw a line connecting the dots, so the graph would be:

graph{x+2y=5 [-7.54, 12.46, -3.48, 6.52]}

May 30, 2018

Answer:

#x+2y=5#
graph{(x^2+(y-5/2)^2-0.01)((x-5)^2+y^2-0.01)(x+2y-5)=0 [-2.59, 7.273, -0.85, 4.08]}

Explanation:

Given the linear equation #x+2y=5#

#{:
(x"-intercept=value of "x" when "y=0," | ",y=0rArrx=5," | ","point: "(5,0)),
(y"-intercept=value of "y" when "x=0," | ",x=0rArry=5/2," | ","point: "(0,5/2))

Plotting each of the two points on the Cartesian plane and drawing a line through them gives the graph shown in the Answer.
:}#