How does a Sulfur -2 ion differ from a neutral Sulfur atom?

1 Answer
Dec 8, 2015

Answer:

Elemental sulfur, or sulfur in a neutral element has 6 electrons associated with it, and is therefore neutral. #S^(2-)# ions has 8 electrons, and therefore bears a 2- minus charge.

Explanation:

Sulfur in thioether, #R-S-R#, or #H_2S#, has 2 lone pairs and an electron from each of the bonds. When it's charge is determined these #6e^-# are balanced by the nuclear charge. In these situations sulfur is neutral. For #HS^-# or #S^(2-)#, there are 7 and 8 electrons associated with the respective sulfur centres, and these bear formal charges of #-1#, and #-2#.