What is the difference between a noun clause and a noun phrase?

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Feb 22, 2016

Answer:

A clause has a subject and a verb, but a phrase doesn't have.

Explanation:

Clause examples:

Mary sings a lullaby song to her baby.

Waking up early in the morning is not easy.

He wants to see her in person.

Her dog, a pug, pulled her blanket.

He hid behind the door.

His shield on fire, he panicked, pressing his controllers up and down and left to right.

A clause can be dependent or independent clause.

Example:

When Jacee heard his father's condition, he ate his meal and finished it earlier than usual.

When Jacee heard his father's condition is an adverbial clause.

But noticed the bolded words, it has a subject which is Jacee and a verb which is heard.

If when is omitted, it can stand alone as an independent clause.

However, placing when at the beginning of the clause has made it as a dependent clause which cannot stand alone like phrases.

Example sentence when when is omitted:

Jacee heard his father's condition, so he ate his meal, and finished it earlier than usual.

As for the phrases, it lacks either a subject or a verb. But usually, it doesn't have a subject or a verb.

There are eight types of phrases: noun, verb, gerund, infinitive, appositive, participial, prepositional, and absolute

Using the clause examples, here are the different types of phrases.

Phrase examples:

noun phrase - a lullaby song

verb phrase (has a verb * sings * but no subject) - sings a lullaby song

gerund phrase - waking up early in the morning

infinitive phrase - to see her in person

appositive phrase - Her dog, a pug , pulled her blanket.

participial phrase - pressing his controllers up and down and left to right

prepositional phrase - behind the door

absolute phrase (has a noun * shield * but no verb) - his shield on fire

Helpful link for phrases:http://examples.yourdictionary.com/phrase-examples.html

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