What temperature scale is used in science?

1 Answer
Jun 18, 2018

Answer:

Well, what temperature scale is appropriate....?

Explanation:

Several experimental gas laws established the dependence between a gaseous volume and temperature. And from the development of ideas of atoms and molecules, the experimental gas laws enabled chemists and physicists to form a pretty shrewd idea about the nature of gaseous particles...and of course from these ideas the molecular nature of matter, especially with regard to gases, were developed.

Old #"Charles' Law"# established the proportionality of volume and temperature....i.e. #VpropT#...and this law proposed that there was a limit with regard to temperature...what today we would call #"absolute zero..."#. And thus at absolute zero, #-273.15# #""^@C# or #0*K# all molecular motion ceases (a simplification!), and this temperature represents the LIMIT of temperature...

Today #-273.15# #""^@C-=0*K#...the #K# stands for #"Kelvin Temperature"#, after William Thomson, later the Lord Kelvin (1824-1907)…

Most of the Gas Laws...#"Charles' Law"#, the #"Ideal Gas Law"# specify the use of the Kelvin scale...

As a curiosity much of the gas laws owe to railway development....i.e. steam driven locomotives directly exploit gaseous pressure to provide motion...