Question #4ab7b

1 Answer
Aug 27, 2016

Answer:

Not quite!

Explanation:

The important thing to always keep in mind when dealing with dilution factors is that the dilution factor depends on two things

  • the volume of the initial solution, i.e. the concentrated solution
  • the total volume of the final solution, i.e. the diluted solution

More specifically, the dilution factor is calculated like this

#color(blue)(|bar(ul(color(white)(a/a)"DF" = V_"final"/V_"initial"color(white)(a/a)|)))#

Here

#V_"final"# - the final volume of the solution
#V_"initial"# - the initial volume of the solution

In your case, you make a solution by dissolving #"0.4772 g"# of solute in #"100 mL"# of water. You then take #"1 mL"# of this solution and add it to another #"100 mL"# of water.

This means that in your case you have

#V_"initial" = "1 mL"#

you start with this sample of concentrated solution

#V_"final" = "1 mL" + "100 mL" = "101 mL"#

you add the concentrated sample to another #"100 mL"# of water

The dilution factor will thus be

#"DF" = (101 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL"))))/(1color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL")))) = 101#

In order to have a dilution factor of #100#, you must take the #"1 mL"# sample and add enough water to get the total volume to #"100 mL"#. This would then get you

#"DF" = (100color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL"))))/(1color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL")))) = 100#

As a final note, a dilution factor equal to #101# means that your initial solution was #101# times more concentrated than the diluted solution.