Question #78d26

2 Answers
Mar 20, 2017

Answer:

My thoughts are offered below. I hope others will join in...

Explanation:

I'm not quite certain how to frame this question, but here goes!

To my knowledge, there is no such thing as #H_4O_2#. When we write the symbols of the elements together this way, we are implying that all the atoms in the formula are bonded into a single molecule.

On that basis, this formula would not represent a molecule that I know of.

If we meant for this to be two water molecules, it should be written #2H_2O#, so that the coefficient in front of the formula tells us these are two separate, but identical particles.

Mar 20, 2017

Answer:

It will be a completely different molecule.

Explanation:

To answer this, you'll need a basic understanding of the Lewis structure and how the Octet Rule works.

https://socratic.org/questions/which-liquid-water-or-alcohol-has-stronger-intermolecular-forces

This is how a water molecule (#H_2O#) looks like if you draw its Lewis structure. Notice that in order to follow the Octet Rule, the #O# atom has to create a SINGLE bond with each of the #H# atoms.

That is, the #O# atom with six electrons on its outer shell ended up sharing two of its electrons with two #H# atoms equally.

As result of the covalent bonding, the #O# atom now has eight valence electrons (resembling the stability of noble gasses) while the #H# atom has two valence electrons (resembling the stability of #He#).

The formula #H_4O_2#, on the other hand, should not exist as it will violate the octet rule. At best, this formula represents a hydrate of a water molecule and should be written like this:

#H_2O# #*# #H_2O# (attracted by weak intermolecular force)

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/447138#section=2D-Structure