What are the six properties of water that result from hydrogen bonding?

1 Answer
Jun 10, 2017

Answer:

This is an old problem.........I don't think it is a particularly good one....

Explanation:

And the six properties:

#1.# #"Surface tension"#; the surface tension of water is particularly high.

#2.# #"Elevated specific heat capacity."#

#3.# #"Elevated specific heat of vaporization."#

#4.# #"Unusual density of liquid VERSUS solid water."# That ice floats on LIQUID water is a HIGHLY unusual property for a liquid. Normally the solid-phase would be DENSER than the liquid phase. The peculiar structure of liquid water at #4# #""^@#, which is a consequence of hydrogen bonding, gives rise to the density. That water is exceptionally dense, certainly denser than most organic solvents, also reflects this property.

#5.# #"Elevated boiling point"#. The normal boiling point of water, which of course is #100# #""^@C# is RIDICULOUSLY high. You compare this with other small molecules, #NH_3#, #CH_4#, #NO_2#, #SO_2# etc. and the boiling point of water is EXCEPTIONAL.

#6.# #"Elevated melting point"#. The #"normal melting point"# of water at ?? is again exceptional, and unusual.

#7.# #"Properties as a solvent"#. Water is a protic, POLAR solvent, which can solvate MOST substances. The polarity of the water molecule, i.e. #stackrel(delta+)H-stackrel(delta-)O-H#, which solvates anions, and cations, is the basis of this property.

I included this property because perhaps the other categories overlap somewhat.

You happy with this? The properties do overlap as I said.....