Can 50mm, 13mm and 12mm be a right triangle?

4 Answers
Jun 10, 2015

Answer:

I do not think so.

Explanation:

Try with Pythagora's Theorem:
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#50^2=13^2+12^2#
#2500=169+144=313# NO

Jun 10, 2015

Answer:

It cannot even be a triangle let alone a right angled one.

Explanation:

If #a#, #b# and #c# are the lengths of the sides of a triangle and #c# is the largest value, then #a+b >= c#

#12 + 13 = 25 < 50#

Jun 10, 2015

Answer:

A triangle with sides 50mm, 13mm, and 12mm can not form a right triangle

Explanation:

By the Pythagorean Theorem, to be a right triangle:
the square of the longest side
must be equal to
the sum of the squares of the other two sides

#color(white)("XXXX")##50^2 = 2500#

#color(white)("XXXX")#1#3^2+12^2 = 169+144 = 313#

#50^2!=13^2+12^2#

Also
Note that no triangle can exist with sides 50mm, 13mm, and 12mm.
Explanation 2:
To form a triangle, every side must be less than the sum of the other two sides.
Picture a line segment of length 50mm with a line segment of 13 mm attached to one end and a line segment of 12 mm attached to the other end. The 13mm and 12mm line segments can not reach far enough to touch each other.

Jun 24, 2015

Answer:

No, not according to the Pythagorean theorem.

Explanation:

If you plug in the side lengths into the Pythagorean theorem, assuming that #50# is the hypotenuse and that side lengths are #13# and #12#, you can calculate whether the triangle is a right triangle or not.

#13^2+12^2 = 313#, while #sqrt(313)# certainly doesn't equal #50^2#.

#a^2+b^2 = c^2#